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Libations: Squab & Wine Pairings

February 24, 2009
Since I felt too inexperienced to summarize the wine myself, I figured I’d leave it to an expert!

Oenological Ramblings
courtesy of Rob of Premier Cru

’05 Passetoutgrain
Ok, this was cheating but I had to make sure there were a couple of bottles I knew we could drink. Passetoutgrain is the only red wine from burgundy that is a blend of Pinot Noir and Gamay. Usually a light quaffer meant for early drinking- this example is more redolent of the illegal and formerly common act of blending Syrah from the Rhone into burgundy to enhance it’s color and body. Opaque in color, black fruits and a surprising amount of tannin that suggest some more bottle aging would be welcome. Passetoutgrain that needs time, what is this world coming to?

’86 Yarra Yering Dry Red No.1
A blend of Cab Sauv, Malbec, Merlot and Petite Verdot. From the guy who brought wine growing back to the Yarra Valley which had been abandoned for some 50 years before his first vintage in ’73. An example that not all Aussi wines are fruit bombs with little to no aging potential. While there was a fair amount of tar-like earthiness at first, as it opened up it presented itself more like cigar box tobacco and spice- and maintained plenty of plum and cassis fruit to keep it interesting. Very little left in the way of tannins but no discoloration, a surprisingly vibrant wine.

’88 Gigondas
Gigondas is one of the few villages in the Southern Rhone that is allowed to bottle it’s own wine. What sets it apart from all the Cote du Rhone that surrounds the village is its charming rusticity, more exotic spice and fuller body. This example showed a high percentage of Syrah and Mourvedre in the blend through the black fruits, licorice, beefy meatiness and pepper. That it was still a wine of considerable weight was a bit shocking.

’75 Tertre Daugay
This may be the vintage that will never die. Known for an endless supply of tannin, this ’75 lived up to my expectations. Very drying tannins that attack the gums and soft palate with a minute amount of red fruits and some brushy earthiness. Will this wine ever find balance? I doubt it will but only more time will tell.

’66 Mirassou Pinot Noir
Certainly a wine in decline but still keeping it together. Color was good though showing its age; a healthy rim of brick highlighting its small core of blackberry purple. Nose showed some fruit, game and tertiary aromas. In the mouth it didn’t disappoint- still fresh, holding on to a bit of acidity and blackberry pinot funk. Damn good with squab.

’70 Chateau Monbazillac
No surprise this botrytis desert wine survived. Based on Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc, the wines of Monbazillac are notoriously long lived. Amber hued and layered with stone fruits, citrus, almonds, lilacs and the funky naughtiness that one expects from “noble rot.” A nice treat especially with Sarah’s apple tart.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. February 25, 2009 7:21 pm

    Wow, do I see some wine journalism in your future? Look out Robert Parker! Thanks again for bringing so many amazing wines. You made the night unforgettable. When’s the next??? I’m thinking wild boar…

  2. February 25, 2009 7:21 pm

    Wow, do I see some wine journalism in your future? Look out Robert Parker! Thanks again for bringing so many amazing wines. You made the night unforgettable. When’s the next??? I’m thinking wild boar…

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